Kyivan Metropolitanate – UAOC http://uaoc.net/ Fri, 27 Aug 2021 05:24:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://uaoc.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Kyivan Metropolitanate – UAOC http://uaoc.net/ 32 32 Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew attends 30th Independence Day celebrations in Ukraine http://uaoc.net/ecumenical-patriarch-bartholomew-attends-30th-independence-day-celebrations-in-ukraine/ http://uaoc.net/ecumenical-patriarch-bartholomew-attends-30th-independence-day-celebrations-in-ukraine/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 05:24:41 +0000 http://uaoc.net/ecumenical-patriarch-bartholomew-attends-30th-independence-day-celebrations-in-ukraine/ KYIV – Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople traveled to Ukraine to participate in the country’s 30th Independence Day celebrations despite opposition from the Russian Orthodox Church. Along with Metropolitan Epifaniy, Primate of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Bartholomew served a divine liturgy in St. Michael’s Cathedral in Kiev on August 21. The next day, […]]]>

KYIV – Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople traveled to Ukraine to participate in the country’s 30th Independence Day celebrations despite opposition from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Along with Metropolitan Epifaniy, Primate of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Bartholomew served a divine liturgy in St. Michael’s Cathedral in Kiev on August 21. The next day, the two men celebrated a solemn divine liturgy near St. Sophia Cathedral. According to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, more than 15,000 worshipers and clergy took part in the service.

Two years ago, Bartholomew I, who is considered the first among his peers in the Orthodox Patriarchate, presented a decree of independence to the head of the nascent Orthodox Church of Ukraine, severing his centuries-old ties with the Russian Orthodox Church. The establishment of an independent Ukrainian Church has become a historical event and has been celebrated by many Ukrainians around the world.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy met with Patriarch Bartholomew on the first day of his visit on August 20.

“First of all, I want to thank you for this visit,” Zelenskyy said. “For me, for Ukraine, for all of us, it is a great honor that you join us on such important days as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of our independence. It is very important for us ”, declared the president.

Patriarch Bartholomew said he was happy to be on the beautiful and hospitable Ukrainian land, especially as Ukraine is celebrating the 30th anniversary of its independence.

“It is a great honor for us to celebrate with you this important date for Ukraine,” said Patriarch Bartholomew.

He has already visited Ukraine twice, his last trip to the country being in 2008 on the occasion of the 1,020th anniversary of Kyivan Rus’ baptism. Ukraine’s 30th anniversary coincides with the 30th anniversary of Bartholomew’s election as Ecumenical Patriarch. Mr. Zelenskyy visited the Ecumenical Patriarch twice during his tenure.

During his conversation with Patriarch Bartholomew, Mr. Zelenskyy noted that Ukraine is an example of a country in which many religious denominations peacefully coexist.

The two men discussed the issue of a peaceful settlement of the conflict in Donbass, violations of fundamental human rights and freedoms, in particular freedom of religion, in the temporarily occupied territories of Ukraine. Mr. Zelenskyy noted that one of the factors Russia uses against Ukraine as a hybrid weapon is religion.

Mr. Zelenskyy thanked the Ecumenical Patriarch for the care and support given to the children of Ukrainian soldiers who lost their parents as a result of Russia’s ongoing aggression against Ukraine.

“I know how warmly you met them in your residence in Fener [the neighborhood in Istanbul in which the ecumenical patriarchy is located] in 2018. I appreciate your willingness to meet them [again] during your visit, ”Zelenskyy said.

The first day of Patriarch Bartholomew’s visit to Ukraine began with a tribute to those who died fighting for the freedom and independence of Ukraine, as well as to the victims of the Holodomor-genocide of 1932-1933. On August 21, Patriarch Bartholomew met with Metropolitan Epifaniy, primate of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, according to the press service of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

Meanwhile, the Russian Orthodox Church has opposed Patriarch Bartholomew’s visit to Ukraine, arguing the trip could spark a possible confrontation between the two churches. The Church of Moscow, which regards Ukraine as its canonical territory, unlike the canons of the Church, does not recognize the decisions of the Ecumenical Patriarch. He severed ties with hierarchs or churches that recognized the independent Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

The Moscow Patriarchate is concerned that after Patriarch Bartholomew’s visit to Ukraine, the churches under the authority of Moscow will come under the jurisdiction of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

Following Bartholomew I’s decision to grant independence to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, the Russian Orthodox Church severed its ties with the Patriarchate of Constantinople in Istanbul. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate has said it will stay away from events Bartholomew I attended, and dozens of its worshipers have gathered in Kiev to protest his visit.

The Moscow Church claimed that Patriarch Bartholomew destroyed all Orthodox unity in an attempt to obtain what they said was unprecedented authority.

“Before our eyes, a completely different model of world orthodoxy is being formed, in which the central place is prepared for the Eastern Pope with unprecedented powers and privileges,” said Metropolitan Anthony (Pakanich) of Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate.

“The adventure of Patriarch Bartholomew in Ukraine in its consequences goes far beyond the dispute over jurisdiction over a certain territory,” Metropolitan Anthony said.

Meanwhile, the Ukrainian World Congress (UWC) welcomed the visit to Ukraine of Patriarch Bartholomew, who played a crucial role in securing autocephaly from the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

“Bringing Ukrainian Orthodoxy back to its historical roots, this momentous event marked the ultimate independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church and fulfilled the aspirations of many generations of Ukrainian Orthodox Christians in Ukraine and in the Diaspora,” said UWC said in a statement.

The UWC worked with the Ukrainian Orthodox Church to lobby for its recognition as an independent Church by other Autocephalous Orthodox Churches.

On August 23, Patriarch Bartholomew met with members of the All-Ukrainian Council of Churches and Religious Organizations.

Metropolitan Epifaniy told Patriarch Bartholomew that after years of coexistence of Christians of different faiths, as well as Muslims and Jews, and after many years of anti-religious persecution, a unique interfaith atmosphere has developed in Ukraine .

The council has been in existence for 25 years and works to promote peace and mutual understanding in Ukraine. As a result, representatives of different religious communities can collaborate on the basis of mutual respect and equal rights, overcoming contradictions and finding consensus despite differences of opinion.

“Leaving aside the issues on which we have different points of view, the members of the Council concentrate on the things on which we have the same position, common or close,” said Metropolitan Epifaniy.

According to the press service of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, Patriarch Bartholomew is known to the world as “the one who builds bridges” largely because of his many years of experience in inter-Christian and inter-religious dialogue. He stressed the role of the Church in resolving contradictions in society, as she can “use the oil of faith to heal and heal the wounds of others, not to kindle new fires of hatred.”

“It is a sign of hope that despite the horrors of the 20th century, the most brutal era in human history, our understanding of dialogue will become an increasingly important tool for building bridges. and be reconciled, ”said Patriarch Bartholomew.


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How Russia is using the Moscow Patriarchate as a weapon to achieve its geopolitical goals, an analysis by the Jamestown Foundation, Washington, DC – Archon News Article http://uaoc.net/how-russia-is-using-the-moscow-patriarchate-as-a-weapon-to-achieve-its-geopolitical-goals-an-analysis-by-the-jamestown-foundation-washington-dc-archon-news-article/ http://uaoc.net/how-russia-is-using-the-moscow-patriarchate-as-a-weapon-to-achieve-its-geopolitical-goals-an-analysis-by-the-jamestown-foundation-washington-dc-archon-news-article/#respond Sat, 31 Jul 2021 14:41:30 +0000 http://uaoc.net/how-russia-is-using-the-moscow-patriarchate-as-a-weapon-to-achieve-its-geopolitical-goals-an-analysis-by-the-jamestown-foundation-washington-dc-archon-news-article/ UPDATE: It has been brought to our attention that the Jamestown Foundation’s assertion in the article below that the Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Moscow Patriarchate did not oppose the Russian occupation of the Crimea and eastern Ukraine is incorrect. The Primate of this Church, Metropolitan Onuphry, wrote to Putin and Patriarch Kirill in 2014 to […]]]>

UPDATE: It has been brought to our attention that the Jamestown Foundation’s assertion in the article below that the Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Moscow Patriarchate did not oppose the Russian occupation of the Crimea and eastern Ukraine is incorrect. The Primate of this Church, Metropolitan Onuphry, wrote to Putin and Patriarch Kirill in 2014 to protest against this occupation. To our knowledge, the rest of this article is correct and raises many important points about the Russian state and the Russian Church.

This particularly illuminating analysis by the Jamestown Foundation shows how the Kremlin is using the Russian Orthodox Church as a “hybrid weapon of war against Ukraine”. It highlights the fundamental hypocrisy of this enterprise, because “while promoting Russia as a supposed authority on Orthodox Christianity and a holy savior in the world, Moscow is ignoring the persecutions of other religious groups in its state. “multicultural friendly” “. More remarkable still, this article reveals how the Kremlin campaign fails, as the Orthodox Church in Ukraine, which received autocephaly from His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew in 2019, continues to grow and prosper.


Religion as a weapon of hybrid warfare to achieve Russia’s geopolitical goals
By: Tetyana Zhurman

On July 28, Ukrainian Orthodox Christians celebrated the 1,033rd anniversary of the baptism of Kyivan Rus, a remarkable annual event in Ukrainian history and another reason for Russian President Vladimir Putin’s political speculation. After the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew I, signed the tomos of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in 2019, granting it autocephaly – independence from the Russian Orthodox Church (see EDM, July 26, 2018; RFE, 23 January 2020) – Experts warned that Moscow would redouble efforts to militarize religious issues as part of its “hybrid war” against Ukraine (Warsawinstitute.org, January 31, 2019).

In his recent article “On the Historical Unity of Russians and Ukrainians” (Kremlin.ru, July 12), Putin calls for “the unity of Orthodox Christianity” in almost every paragraph, with particular emphasis on the adoption by the Prince of Kiev Vladimir the Great of the Christian religion. faith in 988 as a symbol of kinship. In addition, the fact that the ruler of Kyivan Rus was baptized in Chersonesus (now Sevastopol, Crimea) was used by Putin as a justification for the occupation of Crimea, namely “to unify the sacred lands of the cradle of the Slavic nations – Kiev Rus ”(Parlamentskaya Gazeta, July 27, 2018). Yet not only is the association of the terms “Rus” and “Russia” historically erroneous (Fakeoff.org, February 18, 2015; RFE, April 12, 2020), but the fact of Russia’s adoption of the baptism day of Kyivan Rus in 2010— just two years after former Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko’s 2008 decree instituting the holiday raises questions about Russia’s real intentions (Rada.gov.ua, July 25, 2008; Kremlin.ru, June 1, 2010).


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The Primate of the Orthodox Church holds a prayer service on the occasion of the baptism anniversary of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-holds-a-prayer-service-on-the-occasion-of-the-baptism-anniversary-of-kyivan-rus-ukraine/ http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-holds-a-prayer-service-on-the-occasion-of-the-baptism-anniversary-of-kyivan-rus-ukraine/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 11:30:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-holds-a-prayer-service-on-the-occasion-of-the-baptism-anniversary-of-kyivan-rus-ukraine/ Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All Ukraine, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, led a prayer service in front of the monument to Holy Prince Volodymyr in Kiev. The event was part of the celebrations for the 1033rd anniversary of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine’s baptism and the day honoring the memory of holy apostolic prince Volodymyr, the […]]]>

Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All Ukraine, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, led a prayer service in front of the monument to Holy Prince Volodymyr in Kiev.

The event was part of the celebrations for the 1033rd anniversary of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine’s baptism and the day honoring the memory of holy apostolic prince Volodymyr, the Baptist of Rus, reports a correspondent from Ukrinform.

Representatives of OCU dioceses from all over Ukraine gathered on Volodymyrska Hill and walked to the monument of Prince Volodymyr from the Golden-domed St. Michael’s Cathedral, where the Divine Liturgy was held.










Due to health security restrictions, no large crowds were allowed at the event.

As Ukrinform reported earlier, on July 27, the OCU launched festive events in Kiev on the occasion of the 1033rd anniversary of the baptism of Rus-Ukraine. A night vigil took place in Saint-Michel Cathedral, chaired by Metropolitan Epiphanius.

Read also: Some 45% of respondents support the independence of the Orthodox Church from Ukraine – poll

At the same time, the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate gathered its worshipers for a massive procession in Kiev.

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church, amid coronavirus concerns, has refused the option of gathering crowds for any religious procession – in the same way the church did last year.

Every year on July 28 Ukraine celebrates the Rus-Ukraine baptism day. The public holiday was instituted by the presidential decree of July 25, 2008.

On the same day, the Orthodox Church honors the memory of Prince Volodymyr, the Baptist of Rus.

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The Primate of the Orthodox Church organizes a prayer service in Kyivan Rus-U … http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-organizes-a-prayer-service-in-kyivan-rus-u/ http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-organizes-a-prayer-service-in-kyivan-rus-u/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/the-primate-of-the-orthodox-church-organizes-a-prayer-service-in-kyivan-rus-u/ (MENAFN – UkrinForm) Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All Ukraine, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, led a prayer service near the monument to Holy Prince Volodymyr in Kiev. The event was part of the celebrations for the 1033rd anniversary of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine’s baptism and the day honoring the memory of holy apostolic prince Volodymyr, […]]]>

(MENAFN – UkrinForm) Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All Ukraine, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, led a prayer service near the monument to Holy Prince Volodymyr in Kiev.

The event was part of the celebrations for the 1033rd anniversary of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine’s baptism and the day honoring the memory of holy apostolic prince Volodymyr, the Baptist of Rus, reports a correspondent from Ukrinform.

Representatives of OCU dioceses from all over Ukraine gathered on Volodymyrska Hill and walked to the monument of Prince Volodymyr from the Golden-domed St. Michael’s Cathedral, where the Divine Liturgy was held.

Due to health security restrictions, no large crowds were allowed at the event.

As Ukrinform reported earlier, on July 27 the OCU launched festive events in Kiev on the occasion of the 1033rd anniversary of the baptism of Rus-Ukraine. A night vigil took place in Saint-Michel Cathedral, chaired by Metropolitan Epiphanius.

Read also: Some 45% of respondents support the independence of the Orthodox Church from Ukraine – poll

At the same time, the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate gathered its worshipers for a massive procession in Kiev.

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church, amid coronavirus concerns, has refused the option of gathering crowds for any religious procession – in the same way the church did last year.

Every year on July 28 Ukraine celebrates the Rus-Ukraine baptism day. The public holiday was instituted by the presidential decree of July 25, 2008.

On the same day, the Orthodox Church honors the memory of Prince Volodymyr, the Baptist of Rus.

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Interior Minister meets with main Orthodox clerics http://uaoc.net/interior-minister-meets-with-main-orthodox-clerics/ http://uaoc.net/interior-minister-meets-with-main-orthodox-clerics/#respond Tue, 27 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/interior-minister-meets-with-main-orthodox-clerics/ Interior Minister Dionysius Monastyrsky met with the Primate of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Epiphanes, and the head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Onufriy. This is according to the press service of the ministry, reports Ukrinform. During the meeting with the leaders of the two largest Orthodox denominations in Ukraine, the minister discussed the […]]]>

Interior Minister Dionysius Monastyrsky met with the Primate of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Epiphanes, and the head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan Onufriy.

This is according to the press service of the ministry, reports Ukrinform.

During the meeting with the leaders of the two largest Orthodox denominations in Ukraine, the minister discussed the issue of constructive relations between church and government, as well as the need to ensure interfaith peace, law and order.

Separately, the parties discussed in detail the security measures during the mass processions held on July 27 and 28, marking the national holiday, the day of the baptism of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine.

Read also: Ukrainian Orthodox Church autocephaly tomos signed two years ago

Monastyrsky assured church leaders that law enforcement is ready to resolutely counter all possible provocative acts during festive events, including in and around temples and other places of worship.

The minister called on the OCU and UOC leaders to remain balanced and take special responsibility during mass events, expressing the hope for cooperation in this regard and future constructive dialogue.

According to Ukrinform, on July 27, the National Guard and the police stepped up security measures in central Kiev due to the holding of mass events dedicated to the 1033rd anniversary of the baptism of Kyivan Rus-Ukraine.

context

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church received in January 2019 from the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople a tomos of autocephaly, thus completing the process of independence of the Ukrainian Church from the Russian Orthodox Church which traditionally regards Ukraine as forming part of its own canonical territory.

Read also: Epiphanes, Blinken discuss persecution of believers in Russian-occupied territories

On December 15, 2018, the Unification Church Council was held in Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev. The clergy of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate, the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate have established a United Local Orthodox Church of Ukraine, approved its charter and elected its Primate, Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All Ukraine.

The procedure for granting autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church ended on January 6, 2019, when the Patriarchal Church of St. George hosted the presentation of the autocephaly tomos and the divine liturgy was co-chaired by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and Primate of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, Metropolitan Epiphanes of Kiev and All of Ukraine.

Subsequently, Onufriy, the head of the religious organization, who participated in the unification council, reneged on his commitments to recognize the newly created independent church alongside Russian clerics who accused Patriarch Bartholomew of abusing of power and to create a schism among the Ukrainian faithful.

The process of recognition of the OCU by other local Orthodox churches around the world is ongoing, as Russian clergy have vigorously opposed the developments and rallied affiliated churches to hamper them.

The Moscow Patriarchate in Ukraine has also spoken out against the government’s decision to force the name change of religious organizations to reveal in their official title the real centers of decision, which would imply that the UOC of Onufriy is would title “Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine”.

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UCU Senator Emeritus Mykola Kmit receives the Order of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky http://uaoc.net/ucu-senator-emeritus-mykola-kmit-receives-the-order-of-metropolitan-andrey-sheptytsky/ http://uaoc.net/ucu-senator-emeritus-mykola-kmit-receives-the-order-of-metropolitan-andrey-sheptytsky/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:57:58 +0000 http://uaoc.net/ucu-senator-emeritus-mykola-kmit-receives-the-order-of-metropolitan-andrey-sheptytsky/ LVIV – During a national pilgrimage to Zarvanytsia, Ukraine, on July 18, Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church (UGCC) introduced Mykola Kmit, Senator Emeritus and Benefactor of the Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU), the Church’s highest honor, the Order of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky. Entrepreneur and President of IDS Group, Mykola Kmit received the […]]]>

LVIV – During a national pilgrimage to Zarvanytsia, Ukraine, on July 18, Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church (UGCC) introduced Mykola Kmit, Senator Emeritus and Benefactor of the Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU), the Church’s highest honor, the Order of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky.

Entrepreneur and President of IDS Group, Mykola Kmit received the award for his active civic and social position as a UCU senator; for his dedicated service as a member of the Commission to honor the memory of Blessed Priest and Martyr Omelyan Kowcz, who popularized the person of the new martyr of the 20th century; for promoting the recognition in society of laureates worthy of awards in his honor; for active support for the Kyivan Christianity Project, and for many UGCC projects, in particular the construction of a church in the Lutsk Exarchate; the development of sport; and to be an example of good Christian living and active lay service, based on Christian values ​​and the social teaching of righteous Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky.

In the words of His Beatitude Sviatoslav, the award is given to those who continue the work of Metropolitan Andrey, look at the world with his eyes and strive to reach the heights of his thought.

“Today I have the honor and the privilege of awarding this order to Mykola Kmit. He is truly inspired by Andrey Sheptytsky’s gifts and generously supports key initiatives of our Church, ”Major Archbishop Sviatoslav said at the award ceremony on July 18.
“Today we recalled how many myths exist about Kyivan’s Christianity, our origin and our roots, because someone always wants to own our history, ecclesiastical and national. And so, Mr. Kmit supports scholarly study projects researching the sources of Kyivan’s Christianity… So today, in front of the face of God, the faces of our bishops and laity, I gladly sing “Axios” to you ”, Major Archbishop Sviatoslav said at the award ceremony in Zarvanytsia.

Participants of a national pilgrimage gathered in Zarvanytsia, Ukraine on July 18.

Mr Kmit said he did not expect to receive such a distinguished award. Before the pilgrimage to Zarvanytsia, he received a phone call from the Synod of Bishops of the UGCC asking if he could be present at the liturgy. And even then Mr. Kmit said he had no idea he would receive an award.

“When on stage, His Beatitude began to list all of my accomplishments over the years, I was surprised that he knew all of this. It was very moving. My dad watched the recording of this part three times, ”Mr. Kmit said. “Really, this award is also in large part thanks to my parents, as they raised me with a desire to help others. So, on behalf of the whole Kmit family, I would like to thank His Beatitude Sviatoslav and the Synod of Bishops of the UGCC for their support and their trust, which have been shown to me through this award.

Mr. Kmit said the award he received was recognition for the work he has done with other Church benefactors.

“A few years ago, His Beatitude Sviatoslav brought us together for a common breakfast, where he succeeded in encouraging support for UGCC projects,” said Mr. Kmit. “When we first saw the results of our donations, we saw how small this contribution was compared to what had been done. It was also in large part thanks to the late Professor Ihor Skochylias of UCU, who, along with his fellow historians, worked tirelessly to study the sources of Kyivan’s Christianity. In a short time, they managed to publish a whole series of 20 volumes. It was easy for me to coordinate these processes, maybe because people gathered around the idea willingly, because everyone understood their role.


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Archbishop of Cyprus warns dissident bishops, as dissident bishop publishes book on Ukraine http://uaoc.net/archbishop-of-cyprus-warns-dissident-bishops-as-dissident-bishop-publishes-book-on-ukraine/ http://uaoc.net/archbishop-of-cyprus-warns-dissident-bishops-as-dissident-bishop-publishes-book-on-ukraine/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/archbishop-of-cyprus-warns-dissident-bishops-as-dissident-bishop-publishes-book-on-ukraine/ PARSIPPANY, NJ – Archbishop Chrysostomos, Primate of the Orthodox Church of Cyprus, has issued a statement that he will implement methods to establish Synod members of the Church of Cyprus who are not from accord with the decision to recognize autocephaly of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (OCU) which was granted by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew […]]]>

PARSIPPANY, NJ – Archbishop Chrysostomos, Primate of the Orthodox Church of Cyprus, has issued a statement that he will implement methods to establish Synod members of the Church of Cyprus who are not from accord with the decision to recognize autocephaly of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (OCU) which was granted by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew in January 2019.

Metropolitan Athanasius of Limassol, neophyte of Morphia, Metropolitan Nikiforos of Kykkos, Metropolitan Isaiah of Tamasos, as well as Bishop Nicolas d’Amafunt and Bishop Epiphanius of Ledera, who do not recognize OCU autocephaly , refused to participate in the conciliar service appointed by the Synod of the Archdiocese of Cyprus on July 10.

Archbishop Chrysostomos said that the hierarchs’ refusal to perform conciliar service indicates a lack of respect for the decisions of the Synod and an attempt to “bypass the primate”. “I am not dead. I am still alive,” said the Archbishop.

Archbishop Chrysostomos has said that the hierarchs who refuse to serve him are wrong, and if he begins to restore order, the Metropolitans will cease to be members of the synod. “This is why I keep silent, so as not to harm the Church,” he said.

When asked if this crisis would lead to a breakdown of Eucharistic communion within the Archdiocese of Cyprus, Archbishop Chrysostomos replied: “I have the means to put them. [bishops] in their place, but I will not start now.

Meanwhile, Metropolitan Nikiforos on July 1 published a book, “The Church Crisis in Ukraine and Its Solution According to Sacred Canons,” by Holy Trinity Publications (Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia) in Jordanville, NY. The website, including by Metropolitan Timothy of Bostra (Patriarchate of Jerusalem), criticizes Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew’s decision to grant autocephaly to the OCU, calling OCU worshipers “schismatic groups.” Other Orthodox bishops from various jurisdictions also posted comments on the book.

A description of the book notes, “All this [the process of granting autocephaly to the OCU] without any attempt by the Ecumenical Patriarchate to seek a consensus of all the Orthodox Churches before embarking on this path.

This is however false, because all the Orthodox Churches in communion with Constantinople were invited to the Holy and Great Council of the Orthodox Church in 2016 in Crete, in which the Russian Orthodox Church (whose delegation was to include the Metropolitan Onufriy, head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church-Moscow Patriarchate, as well as other UOC-MP bishops in Ukraine), the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Georgian Orthodox Church, the Orthodox Church of Antioch and the Orthodox Church of America.

However, the 2016 Council included representatives from the Patriarchates of Constantinople, Alexandria and Jerusalem, the Serbian Orthodox Church, the Church of Romania, the Church of Cyprus, the Church of Greece, the Church of Poland, the Church of Albania and the Church of the Czech Lands and Slovakia.

The description of the book on the Holy Trinity Publications website continues: “In this concise text he [Metropolitan Nikiforos] eloquently explains why the actions of the Ecumenical Patriarchate have created a schism in the Orthodox Church worldwide and how they in turn reflect the promotion of a new ecclesiology that distorts the traditional understanding of the Orthodox Church as ruled only by Christ himself. It is clear that the only way to cure and end the schism is a return to a form of inter-Orthodox relations which respects both conciliarity and hierarchy. In doing so, he underlines his greatest respect for the historic place of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople and the hope that he will turn away from the path he is currently on to regain his rightful place in the plurality of the Orthodox Church.

The table of contents of the book also asks some strange questions, such as: “Ukraine belongs to the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of which patriarchate? The answer, however, is clear. When Kyivan-Rus was baptized into Christianity in 988 by the Byzantine bishops of Constantinople, the lands today known as Ukraine and beyond were placed under the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate (Church of Constantinople) , because the Moscow Patriarchate did not exist at the time.

Patriarch Bartholomew underlined this on July 26, 2008, during his visit to Ukraine for the 1,020th anniversary of the Christianization of Kyivan-Rus.
” This initiative [to celebrate the 1,020th anniversary] is an obligation insofar as all the great nations must guard with the most zeal their historical memory, in particular of those events which sealed indelibly the own spiritual identity of their national consciousness and determined, more or less, their contribution lasting to the community of nations. It is also and particularly important today, because the depth of the history of the great people constitutes an inexhaustible resource of strength and influence for those who are near and far ”, declared Patriarch Bartholomew.

Patriarch Bartholomew is due to visit Ukraine in August for the celebration of the 30th anniversary of the country’s renewed independence.


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Ukrainian Burial Mound Dig Reveals 5,500-Year-Old Stonehenge-Like Structure http://uaoc.net/ukrainian-burial-mound-dig-reveals-5500-year-old-stonehenge-like-structure/ http://uaoc.net/ukrainian-burial-mound-dig-reveals-5500-year-old-stonehenge-like-structure/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/ukrainian-burial-mound-dig-reveals-5500-year-old-stonehenge-like-structure/ The Scythians and other warring cultures and the archaeological remains of their history are under attack by Ukrainian developers who seek to build new luxury country houses. There are two roadblocks in their pursuit of unrestricted profit. The first is in the form of tumulus 4000 to 5500 years old, numbering nearly 100,000 and scattered […]]]>

The Scythians and other warring cultures and the archaeological remains of their history are under attack by Ukrainian developers who seek to build new luxury country houses. There are two roadblocks in their pursuit of unrestricted profit. The first is in the form of tumulus 4000 to 5500 years old, numbering nearly 100,000 and scattered across the countryside, which are protected only by a very fine topsoil.

“It has a very thin topsoil, literally 10 cm. It is very little and it causes it to swell, deteriorate, etc. That is why it was decided to investigate it, “explains Dmitry Teslenko, head of the Dnieper archaeological expedition of the Ukrainian Archaeological Guard Service.

A unique Ukrainian burial mound found during roadworks in the village of Novooleksandrivka. (Informant)

The second dam to the construction project is the non-governmental preservation group Guardians of the Mounds, founded in 2019 under the auspices of Oleksandr Klykavka, which has grown into a national movement in the past 20 months. In the village of Novooleksandrivka, 10 kilometers (6.21 miles) south of the town of Dnipro, in east-central Ukraine, “excavations of a kurgan or burial mounds have been in progress for more than a month and a half ”reports Archeology news network .

The tumuli and their justification

These are burial mounds that have attracted grave robbers and archaeologists in equal measure, with a variety of artifacts – which includes combs and dishes, but also piles of gold jewelry, according to NY Times . The dimensions of the single kurgan are amazing, 120 x 80 m (393.70 x 262.47 ft) and 7 m (22.97 ft) in height! Proper road clearing and construction equipment had to be used to conduct a field survey of this unimaginable scale, including bulldozers. Excavations have revealed 24 graves from the Bronze Age, Scythians (Iron Age) and the Middle Ages.

“Due to their nomadic nature, people only carried the bare essentials. However, we sometimes find interesting finds: pots, collars made of wolf or dog canids. For example, a burial has now been discovered where dog toe bones lay next to human remains. A triple tomb was also found where the skeleton of a man lay in the middle and the skeletons of a woman and a child were pressed against him on either side. “, says Teslenko.

Graves found in a Ukrainian tumulus. (Archidnipro)

“The central part is currently being explored. There is a lot of manual labor. We also use machines. But I want to clarify that all machines work only under the supervision of archaeologists. The bulldozer removes several centimeters of the soil layer and if we see that something is wrong, the work stops, ”says field archaeologist Yaroslav Yaroshenko.

Several historians postulate that the burial mounds served a purpose that went beyond simple religious rites. The nobles were sent to the afterlife with the luxury and status they enjoyed when they were alive, with “women, servants and horses sacrificed”.

There are other interpretations of the mounds as well, keeping in mind the topography of the Ukrainian countryside and lands, and the ever-looming threat of a Russian invasion. The mounds may have been erected as a show of strength and defiance against the enemy, most certainly the Russians, to deter their advance into lands that were not theirs.

The Cromlech – A Ukrainian Stonehenge?

The mound has been dated to 5,500 years ago, coinciding with the Eneolithic period (the period of transition from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age, 2500-2000 BC). In the middle of the mound, the “Dnipro Stonehenge” was found – a series of stone blocks (like megaliths) forming a circle 18 m (59.06 ft) in diameter, called a “cromlech”. According to the archaeologist:

“As for the stone circle, it should be noted that above all it had a purely structural function. The cromlech is an integral part of a massive and complex structure. The structure consisted of a stone circle arranged vertically. There was a truncated cone at the top of the circle. This provided support for the ground and prevented the mound from spreading outward. Mounds could then have other symbolic meanings. For example, one of the most famous cromlechs in the world , Stonehenge, has repeatedly been interpreted as a druid shrine or astronomical observatory. It should also be noted that the oldest burials on the Novoalexandrovsky mound date from around 3,500 BC This potentially suggests that the cromlech near the Dnieper is older than Stonehenge.

The stone circle discovered in the Ukrainian tumulus. (Archidnipro)

The challenge of the Ukrainian tumuli and a precise historical reconstruction

Ukraine is coming to terms with its illustrious past, even as the Russian threat is constantly on the horizon. In this environment, a development of fascinating scientific techniques provides many answers to the ancient history of Ukraine, including DNA taken from the inhabitants of the mounds. It is imperative to preserve this history by studying it first, rather than destroying it for housing.

As it stands, these mounds have been repeatedly looted and stripped of their valuables, making reconstruction of the past even more difficult. These mounds were also reused, with new bodies dumped into older structures to reduce labor costs and effort, while still enjoying the splendor of royal burials.

For example, one of the Dnipro mounds “dates from prehistoric Indo-Iranian culture”, but contains a coffin dating from the 4th century BC. Another addition to this mound is a coffin emblazoned with a red star, possibly a local Communist Party leader. A Scythian mound also witnessed a mass burial of deceased WWII soldiers, with the Soviet government building a monument at the top.

“The exploration of the mound is not yet complete. The best is yet to come, ”says Teslenko. “In about a week, we will completely clean up the cromlech and the space inside, allowing the old structure to be seen in a practically pristine condition. It is estimated that in just ten days we will reach the most burial places. older inside the stone ring, weather permitting, “Teslenko adds.” It is certainly inevitable that the individual buried and protected by the cromlech was highly respected by this society. This is the only way to explain the monumental character of the construction. ”

Top image: Excavation of a unique Ukrainian burial mound found during roadworks in the village of Novooleksandrivka. Source: Archidnipro

By Rudra Bhushan


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Chicago Community Celebrates Ukraine’s Historical and Contemporary Heroes http://uaoc.net/chicago-community-celebrates-ukraines-historical-and-contemporary-heroes/ http://uaoc.net/chicago-community-celebrates-ukraines-historical-and-contemporary-heroes/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/chicago-community-celebrates-ukraines-historical-and-contemporary-heroes/ CHICAGO – Initiated by the Ukrainian organization “Pomarancheva Khvylia”, in collaboration with the Ukrainian Congress Committee of the America-Illinois Division, the Ukrainian community in Chicago gathered on May 22 to celebrate Ukraine’s Heroes Day . Members of the Ukrainian community gathered at the Ukrainian National Museum in Chicago for this year’s commemoration. Vasyl Tretyak served […]]]>

CHICAGO – Initiated by the Ukrainian organization “Pomarancheva Khvylia”, in collaboration with the Ukrainian Congress Committee of the America-Illinois Division, the Ukrainian community in Chicago gathered on May 22 to celebrate Ukraine’s Heroes Day .

Members of the Ukrainian community gathered at the Ukrainian National Museum in Chicago for this year’s commemoration. Vasyl Tretyak served as the emcee for the event.

The day is dedicated to all Ukrainians who gave their lives for the freedom and independence of Ukraine throughout the nation’s history, from those who fought in the name of Kyivan Rus to the Ukrainians who are now defending their country in the ongoing war in Donbass. The day was first celebrated in 1941 on May 23, when most Ukrainians in the west of the country commemorate the country’s heroes.
The rally began with the singing of the US national anthem by Ksenya Levkovych and the Ukrainian national anthem by Solomia Khudyk. Recognition of speakers and guests followed. Among those recognized were Andriy B. Futey, Chairman of the Committee of the Ukrainian Congress of America and Vice-Chairman of the Ukrainian World Congress; the Ukrainian Consul General in Chicago Serhiy Koledov; Dan I. Diaczyn, Chairman of the Ukrainian Congress Committee of the America-Illinois Division; Reverend Ivan Lymar of the Ukrainian Orthodox St. Volodymyr Cathedral in Chicago; Roman Yatskivskyy, president of “Pomarancheva Khvylia” and organizer of the event. The event also included representatives of the Belarusian community organization in Chicago.

An opening prayer was led by Reverend Ivan Lymar, who took a moment to remind the audience of the heroes of Ukraine’s liberation struggle at different times in Ukrainian history.

Mr. Koledov, Consul General of Ukraine in Chicago, gave a brief historical overview of the significance of Heroes Day.

“Currently, this holiday is not official; but the tradition of honoring heroes on May 23 is growing in popularity, ”Koledov said. “May is the month in which Mykola Mikhnovsky, founder of the ideology of the Ukrainian independence movement at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, [as well as other] leaders of the Ukrainian liberation movement have been killed.

Mr. Koledov underlined that “the events of the last seven years have added to the pantheon of Ukrainian heroes, the“ heavenly cents ”, as well as the military and volunteers who have defended the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine in the struggle continues The Russian Federation. In addition, the heroes are replenished daily… the heroes are also those who help the military, financially and materially; volunteers, medical personnel and those who have taken a fighting stance in the media and on the Internet against the Russian occupiers of eastern Ukraine.

UCCA President Andriy Futey said: “The heroes we honor today knew that Russia will never leave Ukraine alone. When we properly honor the memory of those who died in the struggle for independence, it is very important for all of us to speak with one voice. We are the organ that can tell the world that Russia’s aggression is a threat not only to Ukraine, but also to the whole free and democratic world.

The event included an artistic program prepared by Svitlana Polak and Vita Polak, directors of the studio “Elegia”. Ksenya Levkovych performed the song “Ти повертай лелеко мій” (Return my stork), while Solomia Khudyk performed “Життям заплачу” (I will pay with my life).

“Pomarancheva Khvylia” was created in 2008 by Yuriy Melnyk, Halyna Boryslavska, Taras Vasylyk and Yaroslav Zahaiskyy. The organization strives to include and engage with newcomers from Ukraine to actively participate in the Ukrainian community in Chicago.

Maria Korkatsch-Groszko, Ph.D., is vice-chair of the Ukrainian Congress Committee for the America-Illinois Division.


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Latinized? | Ukrainian weekly http://uaoc.net/latinized-ukrainian-weekly/ http://uaoc.net/latinized-ukrainian-weekly/#respond Fri, 15 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 http://uaoc.net/latinized-ukrainian-weekly/ History will likely remember 2020 as the year of the Coronavirus. It is also the 300th anniversary of a relatively forgotten but still influential Synod of the Church. At that time, what is now Ukraine was divided between Russia and Poland-Lithuania. After defeating the last Kozak liberation attempt at Poltava in 1709, Peter I’s autocratic […]]]>

History will likely remember 2020 as the year of the Coronavirus. It is also the 300th anniversary of a relatively forgotten but still influential Synod of the Church.

At that time, what is now Ukraine was divided between Russia and Poland-Lithuania. After defeating the last Kozak liberation attempt at Poltava in 1709, Peter I’s autocratic and expansionist Russian empire was in full swing. Sweden was in decline. The Polish-Lithuanian “noble republic”, with its Saxon king and parliamentary system, was weak and disorganized, gradually becoming a virtual Russian protectorate. The Moscow Patriarchate, having illegally annexed the Orthodox Metropolis of Kiev in 1685-1686, will be abolished in 1721 under the reforms of Tsar Peter, which made the Church practically an arm of the state. But in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth the Church’s union was growing, when the Eparchy Peremyshl joined it in the 1690s and, in the early 1700s, the Eparchies of Lviv and Lutsk, the brotherhood of the Dormition of Lviv and the Pochayiv Monastery. It was time to consolidate and organize the Uniate Ruthenian (Belarusian-Ukrainian) Metropolis. A provincial synod was planned in Lviv.

It was in fact an epidemic which caused its transfer to the exquisite Renaissance city of Zamość (Zamostya). Held in August-September 1720, the synod brought together Metropolitan Lev Kyshka, seven bishops, 129 priests and monks, and two lay people from the Lviv brotherhood, as well as the papal nuncio, Girolamo Grimaldi. Confirmed by the Holy See in 1724, its decrees still affect the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church today. (Yurii Fedoriv, ​​Istoriya Tserkvy v. Ukraini, Lviv, 2001, pp. 250-252.)

Ukrainian Orthodox historians took a dim view of the Zamostian Synod and its consequences. Volodymyr Antonovych wrote that after Zamość the union became “a kind of crusade” whose supporters were filled with “fanaticism” and “devoid of all religious and human morals” (“Narys Stanovyshcha Pravoslavnoyi Tserkvy na Ukraini vid Polovyny XVII do Kintsia XVII st. ”, in M. Hrushevsky, O. Levytsky,“ Rozvidky pro Tserkovni Vidnosyny na Ukraini-Rusy XVI-XVIII vv ”, Lviv 1900, reprint 1991, pp. 135-136).

Some of the synodal decisions, such as those confirming the primacy of the Pope and requiring his commemoration in liturgies, were fundamental and obvious. Others concerned practical matters such as diocesan administration, property, seminaries and clerical education, and the duties of priests. Confession and communion were regulated. The monasteries were reformed and reunited under the Basilians. Simony was banned, as were multiple mass intentions. Fasts and holidays have been defined. The teaching on relics, miracles and the worship of saints has been clarified. Only one service log was mandated. Only Basilians – the most educated of the clergy – were eligible to become bishops.

Controversially, however – and despite the will expressed by the bishops in 1595 – the synod added the filioque (“i syna” – “and of the Son”) to the Creed. Recently, this addition was canceled in the Ukrainian Catholic Church in North America, although it is still heard in Ukraine.

Although the Orthodox bishops who requested the reunion with the Roman Church in June 1595 insisted in their “articles” that their rite be preserved intact, and although the Holy See consented in December, the synod of Zamość codified a host of liturgical changes that brought the Uniates closer to the Roman rite. Among them were low (“read”) masses, the baptism of infants by sprinkling rather than by immersion, liturgies at side altars, and the ringing of small bells during service. The addition of hot water (zeon or teplota) to the chalice has been abolished, and a cloth has been substituted for the sponge. Chrismation was authorized; the communion of children was not. (Peter Galadza, “Liturgical Latinization and Ecumenism of Kiev: Losing the Koine of the Koinonia”, Logos, vol. 35 (1994), nos. 1-4, pp. 173-194, at 183-185; o. Iuliian Katrii , ChSVV, “Piznai Svii Obriad, 3rd ed., Lviv, 2004; Viktor Zaslavsky,” Skhidna Tserkva u Yevropeiskykh Shatakh: Zamoiskyi Synod 1720 Roku “, Patriarkhat, n ° 2, 2017, pp. 24-26.)

As Sophia Senyk points out, many of these “Latinizations” had already been introduced by the Uniates themselves, especially after the Khmelnytsky rebellion, when their Church lost its cultural confidence. Driven by feelings of inferiority, they approach the Latin rite. In the midst of advanced Western culture, this may have been inevitable. (Sofia Senyk, “Latynizatsiya v Ukrainskii Katolytskii Tserkvi”, Zbirnyk Prats Yuvileinoho Konhresu, Munich 1988/1989, pp. 269-286). Viktor Zaslavsky argues in the same way that surrounded by the flourishing European culture of Poland-Lithuania, Uniate clergy and devotees naturally absorbed Latin consciousness and aesthetics as well as such practices as statues and side altars, pews, bells, frequent confession and communion and Eucharistic processions. (Zaslavski 26).

The Greco-Catholic synods of Lviv of 1891 and 1992 confirmed the Zamostian liturgical precepts, and although an Instruction from the Congregation for the Oriental Churches effectively revoked most of them in 1996, several are still practiced today. . This is not trivial, because the faith and the liturgy are intimately linked.

Many Ukrainian Catholics denounce the Latinizing effects of Zamość. What is Latinization? Ms. Senyk argues that Latinization is not all borrowing from the West, but rather “the passive and uncritical acceptance of all that is foreign and the simultaneous neglect and forgetting of what is ours.” It is inappropriate when it introduces what is “foreign to the spirit of the Eastern Church”. But each age understands this differently (Senyk 280). Father Peter Galadza defines Latinization as “the importation or imposition on Byzantine rite worship of the spirit, practices and priorities of Latin liturgy and theology”. They are “inappropriate” if they are “inorganic to the Byzantine system”. They are “inorganic” if “the structural, theological or spiritual genius of the Byzantine tradition is violated” (Galadza 176).

Today, should we purify our Byzantine Kyivan Rite of all Latin accretions, or keep those that have been organically assimilated? Should it reflect Ukrainian Orthodox practice? Should we aim for uniformity across Ukraine and our diaspora, or allow varied development nurtured by surrounding cultures? Should the rite be exactly the same in Frackville and Frankivsk – in Peremyshl, Perth and Prudentopolis? There is a lot to ponder.

The author thanks Daniel Galadza for his help in this article.

Andrew Sorokowski can be contacted at andrewsorokowski@gmail.com.


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